Rogernomics

Wikipedia describes Rogernomics as follows;

The term Rogernomics, a portmanteau of “Roger” and “economics”, was created by analogy with Reaganomics to describe the economic policies followed by New Zealand Finance Minister Roger Douglas from his appointment in 1984. The policies included cutting agricultural subsidies and trade barriers, privatising public assets and the control of inflation through measures rooted in monetarism, and were regarded in some quarters of Douglas’s New Zealand Labour Party as a betrayal of traditional Labour ideals. The Labour Party subsequently retreated from pure Rogernomics, which became a core doctrine of ACT.

In other words it’s mostly economic reform inspired by classical liberalism as it happened in New Zealand in the 1980s. Roger Douglas left the New Zealand parliament at the end of 1988, so this it all old news perhaps, however it may get a new run in the New Zealand media given the following news about ACT;

The Act Party is almost certain to return to Parliament with leader Rodney Hide holding a huge lead in the Epsom electorate race, internal polling obtained by the National Business Review suggests.

Mr Hide needs to keep the Epsom seat to ensure that Act makes it into Parliament. If he wins Epsom, Act will get its full share of the party vote represented in Parliament without having to reach the 5% threshold under MMP.

Act has consistently polled under 5% since the last election, but has tracked up slightly in recent polls to between 1.5% and 2.5%. That would bring two more Act MPs into Parliament – useful for National in forming a government, as the election race looked to tighten up even before a difficult week and a half for that party.

The article suggests that not only will ACT get Rodney Hide returned to parliament (he is number one one on the party list but will win the seat of Epson independent of the party list) but it will get two others into parliament as well. What the article doesn’t mension is that the number three candidate on the ACT party ticket is one Roger Douglas.

http://www.act.org.nz/list-candidates

6 thoughts on “Rogernomics

  1. At the 2005 election ACT faced political annihilation. ACT is an offshoot of the New Zealand Labour party. However the Labour party was so keen to see ACT elliminated in that election that in the seat of Epson it told it’s supporters to vote for the opposition (National Party) candidate.

  2. It’s amazing to see just what a part is capable of once they have an elected member.

    1.5-2.5% of the vote isn’t much, but look at how professional their campaign still looks.

    Does anyone know what it is about Rodney Hide that allows him to win Epson? You’d think that minor parties would only achieve representation by MMP, but there’s a whole electorate in NZ that adheres primarily to liberalism?

  3. It’s amazing to see just what a party is capable of once they have an elected member.

    1.5-2.5% of the vote isn’t much, but look at how professional their campaign still looks.

    Does anyone know what it is about Rodney Hide that allows him to win Epson? You’d think that minor parties would only achieve representation by PR, even in MMP, but there’s a whole electorate in NZ that adheres primarily to liberalism?

  4. I met Sir Roger in the Sydney Qantas Club last year. He was sharp and had a very broad range of knowledge about the goings on here in Australia. At his age he should be kicking back and relaxng, but still feels he has lots to give.

  5. Pingback: New Zealand heads to the polls « Thoughts on Freedom

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