The jokes write themselves

Liberal MP Mal Washer said it was “crazy” to freeze politicians’ pay… “The reason I think it’s crazy is … because one of our biggest problems is recruiting good people into politics,” Dr Washer said. Without proper pay, there was a risk only “clowns”, “losers”, “screwballs” and “halfwits” would want to enter politics.

Hahaha. I’m much more concerned about politicians who think that government can and should do things which it can’t and shouldn’t:

“We need highly professional, highly skilled people to run the economy,” he said.

Of course, Washer is right. So the last thing we want is high politician salaries to attract those professional, highly skilled people out of the economy and into the vast sink hole that is Australian politics.

7 thoughts on “The jokes write themselves

  1. Q. What do you call a good politician?

    A. Don’t worry, nobody else knows, either!
    or
    A. Got you! That was a trick question!

    Q. Why are Churchill, Curtin, and Roosevelt called good leaders?

    A. Because they’re dead!!!

  2. It amazes me how many smart business people in Australia expect the government to run the economy. Even bank economists, some of whom are quite intelligent, spend inordinate time discussing and analysing government policy and the government’s intentions. All the while the economists in Treasury, who are also said to be fairly bright, sit around analysing what’s happening in the private sector. It’s unhealthy.

    But whether low salaries for politicians would ensure the brightest people stay out of politics is a moot point. Politician salaries are already pretty ordinary compared to management salaries. And whether having dickheads as politicians means they interfere less in our lives is very questionable. Look at that numbskull Chris Bowen. He’s a complete meathead but still managed to foist Fuelwatch and Grocerychoice on us.

  3. Keynesian demand side rhetoric seems to hold great sway in business circles. I think that this is essentially because on the microeconomic scale of the firm consumer demand does indeed seem to be the origin of prosperity. Unfortunately few people grasp the essence of Says law or it’s macroeconomic implications.

  4. Yes, the economy doesn’t need to be run, or managed… it needs to be let be. It’s a tough sell though. Most people in the street seem to blame the current financial crisis on lack of regulation/management.

    …whether having dickheads as politicians means they interfere less in our lives is very questionable. Look at that numbskull Chris Bowen. He’s a complete meathead but still managed to foist Fuelwatch and Grocerychoice on us.

    True… but the “intelligent” types will come up with all sorts of new and inventive ways to interfere – even amongst libertarians. Economists in particular can’t help themselves – they love thinking of new ways to tax people.

  5. We need to provide incentives to politicians! Give them a commission that is inversely proportional to the amount of tax they decide to take from us. Less wasteful spending and more money for us to do with as we please.

  6. Ben, would you support my idea of a ‘Saint George’ award? To be given to the politician who reduces government red tape? It’s a basic law of economics that if you reward a behaviour, you get more of it, so how about it?

  7. Here’s a joke I just came up with.
    Q. How many police does it take to change a light bulb?
    A. Just leave one policeman alone with that lightbulb for an hour, and the light bulb will change its’ mind and confess to any crime you want solved!

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